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Posts Tagged ‘virtue’

means well + ethical hero + dualism + Taliban

January 23, 2008 Leave a comment

MASS – (Fr Alvarez) — [an “extremely liturgically strict” priest is a poor example]

AQUINAS – (Fr Vallee) — 3 reasons for studying philosophy: (1) apologetic, (2) dogmatic, and (3) pastoral.  Nemo dat quod non habet = no one gives what they don’t have.  CCD teacher that only teaches emotion … 8th grader observation: “She means well, but doesn’t mean much.”

Søren KierkegaardCONTEMPORARY PHIL – (Fr Santos) — finished Kierkegaard‘s Either/Or.  The “ethical existence” is choosing to be who and what one truly and uniquely is (a subject, a self, unlike any other self, unlike any other thing).  Even though we have many potential directions, TO WILL EVERYTHING IS TO ULTIMATELY WILL NOTHING (one’s energy is dissipated).  The self willing involves an ongoing task/process, not a finished product.  Negative view of the “mystic.”  The “ethical hero” is interested in becoming a “genuine human being” and “honesty to oneself” ready to give up the aesthetic if it classes with the ethical or “for the sake of” something higher.  The RELIGIOUS STATE is an intensified version of the ethical, making a relationship with God the highest priority.  — need to read Karl Marx Communist Manifesto for Friday.

MEDIEVAL PHIL – (Fr Vallee) — elitism (death penalty debate) + virtue (through humility) + dualism (the Forms eternal are a problem to creation) + Justin Martyr (creation, faith & reason) + Philo the Jew (the Forms are ideas in the mind of God)

WORKLIST — with the rain, the “outdoor guys” were reassigned to help other crews, which made our McCarthy House crew finish even faster.

HOLY HOUR – (Fr Alvarez) — Taliban + scandal + “be a man

DOTSNext

moral virtues

November 29, 2007 1 comment

Today’s Rector’s Conference was for new guys on “The Moral Virtues in Relationship to Seminary Life:”

I.  Opening reflection: Ephesians 4:30-5:2

II.  Pope John Paul II speaks to French Bishops about Priestly Formation (March 22, 1997):

(8.) Composed of people from different walks of life, the seminary must become a family and, in that image, enable each young man, with his own sensitivity, to develop his vocation, to become aware of his future commitments and to be formed in the community, spiritual and intellectual life under the guidance of a team of priests and teachers trained specifically for this task.  … Further, it is appropriate to develop in candidates the practice of the theological and moral virtues, by training them to discipline their lives and to exercise self-control. A future priest must also learn to put his life in the Saviour’s hands, to consider himself a member of the diocesan Church and, through her, of the universal Church, and to undertake his activity in the perspective of pastoral charity.

III.  (this year’s seminary theme is) Living the Real: Jesus, the Incarnate Mystery

IV.  Habits & Virtues
        A.  “Habit” — a quality difficult to uproot that is well or ill-disposed regarding his nature or operations
        B.  “Virtue” — good habit

V.  Kinds of Virtues
        A.  The Natural Intellectual Virtues
                1.  Virtues of Speculative Intellect (Understanding of First Principles & Science)
                2.  Virtues of Practical Intellect (Art & Prudence)
        B.  The Nature Moral Virtues (Cardinal Virtues)
                Prudence, Justice, Temperance, Fortitude
        C.  Theological Virtues  (for next week)
                Faith, Hope, Love

VI.  Moral Virtue: PRUDENCE
        A.  Prudence — order of right reason applied to doing things (human acts)
        B.  Sins against Prudence
                1.  Sins by Defect
                        a.  Precipitation (Haste)
                        b.  Inconsideration (Thoughtlessness)
                        c.  Inconstancy
                        d.  Negligence
                2.  Sins by Excess
                        a.  Carnal Prudence — using reason to get an evil end
                        b.  Craftiness — use evil means to get a good end
                        c.  Excessive Solicitude — too prudent to move (paralyzed)

VII.  Moral Virtue:  JUSTICE
        A.  Justice — constant & perpetual will to render to everyone his due
        B.  Verbal Justice outside of judicial proceedings:
                        a.  Contumely (reviling, insult)
                        b.  Detraction (backbiting) — Simple (spread truth) & Calumny (spread lies)
                        c.  Whispering (tale-bearing)
                        d.  Derision (mockery) — joking manner
                        e.  Cursing — wishing evil on someone

VIII.  Moral Virtue:  TEMPERANCE
        A.  Temperance — moderate man’s appetites …
        B.  Vices opposed to Temperance
                1.  Insensibility — too much
                2.  Intemperance/Immoderation — do whatever you want
        C.  Related Virtue vs Vices
                1.  Abstinence (from food) vs Gluttony
                2.  Sobriety vs Drunkenness
                3.  Chastity, Purity, Virginity vs Lust
                4.  Meekness, Clemency vs Anger, Cruelty
                5.  Modesty vs Pride
                6.  Modesty of Action and Dress
                        a.  Good manner in society
                        b.  Modesty in external behavior (“father” neither too macho nor effete)
                        c.  Modesty in Recreation
                        d.  Modesty in Dress

IX.  Moral Virtue:  FORTITUDE
        A.  Fortitude — pursue a difficult good even in the face of death or danger
        B.  Vices:
                1.  Cowardice
                2.  Fearlessness
                3.  Foolhardiness (too clueless to know one should be afraid)
        C.  Assist vs Oppose
                1.  Magnanimity
                        a.  Presumption (overestimate our ability)
                        b.  Ambition
                        c.  Pusillanimity (underestimate ability)
                2.  Magnificence vs Stinginess
                3.  Patience vs Impatience
                4.  Perseverance vs Inconstancy

X.  Pope Benedict Speaks

XI.  Colossians 3:9-17

(no finished — details need to be added)